Photo Credit: David https://www.flickr.com/photos/davidw/2201077748/in/photostream/

Sip tip: Malbec Argentina wine

Photo Credit: David https://www.flickr.com/photos/davidw/2201077748/in/photostream/

Photo Credit: David

In 2015, the Mendoza region of Argentina got ranked by Huffington Post as the fourth top wine destination in the world.  The Malbec Argentina grapes especially, has over the years become grown in popularity for its small, and more condensed clusters of grapes, bringing plump dark fruit flavors and smoky finish to the final product. 

Though an innovation of France, the grape never surfaced as a top French variety due to its poor resistance to weather and pests. In the mid 19th century, it found a new home in Mendoza when the provincial governor conscripted French agronomists to bring grapevines from France to Argentina. The Malbec Argentina grapes has grown in the region ever since, and has adapted very well to the high altitude regions of Luján de Cuyo and the Uco Valley.

The specific Malbec variant introduced to Mendoza have (most likely, although there are some disputes) gone extinct in France since, proving the uniqueness of Argentine Malbec winery. It holds a velvety texture and deep red hues that are similar to Syrah and Mourvedre, but is distinguished by a bright magenta rim that shows at a closer look.

In lower elevations, Malbec Argentina grapes struggle to produce the acidity they need to create great tasting and long lasting wine, which makes higher elevations more suitable for the growing of Malbec grapes, where they produce more acidity. The bold flavors and richness of the wine is, contrary to many wine tasters belief, not the caused by an industrious use of oak. An approximate of 6-12 months is all it takes for Malbec wines to hit that classic ‘blueberry’ tone, and up to 20 months for a notable sensorial pleasure.

Some sip tips for the weekend?

Here are some delicious Malbec Argentina Wines:

Las Perdices Malbec Argentina

Photo Credit: Reverse Wine Snob

The 2013 Las Perdices Malbec from Agrelo, Lujan de Cuyo, Mendoza. A highly drinkable Malbec that still offers a bit of complexity. Much dark fruit and oak (eight months/french and american) that hangs around for quite a while, ending with a burst of spice. Around $12/750 ml.

2012 Trivento Golden Reserve Malbec Argentina

Photo Credit: Reverse Wine Snob

The 2012 Trivento Golden Reserve Malbec from Lujan de Cuyo, Mendoza. A well-structured, smooth and dry wine full of deep fruit flavors and tinged with toasty oak (12 months/french), that ends on notes of chocolate and tobacco. Around $17/750 ml.

2012 Zuccardi Serie A Malbec Argentina

Photo Credit: Reverse Wine Snob

The 2012 Zuccardi Serie A Malbec from Uco Valley, Mendoza. A smooth and very well balanced wine with lots of deep and juicy dark fruit with nice contrasts of black pepper and spice. Partly oaked (70%) and ends on more juicy fruit and lots of lingering spice. Around $15/750 ml.

 

If you would like to visit these and other vineyards in Mendoza Argentina,  Experience Argentina provides a Mendoza Wine Tour and a Wine Tour of Argentina.

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